Heat Transfer Printing Info

There are many types of Iron-on transfer papers, printers, inks and heat applications but the right combination is essential to achieve the best quality.  After extensive research Igor’s T-shirts uses  the best printer, ink, and heat transfer paper combination plus an industrial iron for heat application.  We are confident that we provide the best possible quality you can get in an iron-on transfer!

That said, there are some things you’ll want to know.  Iron-on transfer paper for DARK COLORED SHIRTS and Iron-on transfer paper for LIGHT COLORED SHIRTS is different.

TRANSPARENT Iron-on Transfers on White (or light) Shirts:

w event staff

Iron-on heat transfers will always be most vibrant on white fabric.

Immediately after being heated onto the shirt there will be some texture to the transfer, but it is not very noticeable and will blend in very nicely because the paper is completely transparent.  All negative space will be the color of the fabric.

Once it has been washed, the texture/sheen will be gone, the ink will have blended with the fibers of the shirt and you won’t be able to see the outline of the transfer.  It’s not like screen-printing which sits on the fabric, lasts almost forever and will achieve more vibrant colors, but with proper care (and the right ink/paper/heat combo) it will last years with very little fading.

This color shirt would generally be too dark for the translucent heat transfer paper but because the text is black and the paper blends in nicely it works.

Notice how you can see the "ash" texture of the "light ash gray" colored t-shirt through the yellow graphic.  In this case it doesn't hurt, but it's a good example of how the translucency of the heat tranfer paper affects the blend of the ink colors and the fabric colors.

Notice how you can see the “ash” texture of the “light ash gray” colored t-shirt through the yellow graphic. In this case it doesn’t hurt, but it’s a good example of how the translucency of the heat transfer paper creates a blending of the ink colors and the fabric colors.

 

photo heat transfer of Miley Cyrus on a T-shirt

photo quallity heat transfer of Miley Cyrus on a T-shirt

Transparent heat transfer paper for light fabric works well on white, light gray, pastels and as shown above it looks great on safety orange.

 

 OPAQUE Iron-on Transfers on Dark Shirts:

jack daniels whiskey t-shirt

We took this photo with lighting reflecting the sheen of the transfer. Notice how it looks a bit like a sticker applied to the surface as apposed to screen printing which would apply white plastisol ink directly to the fabric. In the case of screen printing, all of the negative black space would be fabric. In the case of an opaque heat transfer, we must print out the entire page and melt it onto the fabric. We always trim the graphics in a way that complements the graphic design. It still works well with this graphic because we know this to be a label stuck to a bottle.

Our Iron-on transfer paper for darks is the best we’ve found so far.  It’s opaque so it is a bit thicker, has more sheen and an outline is more obvious than the transparent paper for white fabrics, but it still has a nice stretch, drape, soft touch and produces vibrant, photo quality color.

 

With the proper care (and yes, our ink/paper/heat combo), it will also last forever.  It may be a little crinkly after you wash it, but if you iron it inside-out it will be as good as new.

 

We want you have a good understanding of the result you will get with this paper.  This heat transfer paper is OPAQUE.  Therefore, you will not see through to the fabric behind it. It will look more like a sticker stuck very flush onto your garment (but totally permanent) It has a light, thin feel of vinyl and you will see a difference between the matte of the fabric and the slight sheen of the graphic. This can work great with some graphics and may not be as ideal with others.

 

 

This is a good example of a graphic that works well with opaque heat transfers. It's a tight, patch-like graphic without a lot of negative space. We print the background to match the fabric pretty closely, but it can't always match exactly. You see the blue outline, but it looks great! And it's a cost effective way to get full color graphics on your garments.

This is a good example of a graphic that works well with opaque heat transfers. It’s a tight, patch-like graphic without a lot of negative space. We print the background to match the fabric pretty closely, but it can’t always match exactly. You see the blue outline, but it looks great! And it’s a cost effective way to get full color graphics on your garments.

 

This is a good example of a graphic that may be disappointing if you don't have the right expectation.  With screen printing, you will have the white and red ink directly applied to the fabric, but when you are only making one shirt it's just not feasible to do it that way.   Other than direct to garment printing, this would be the only way to make one black garment with this graphic.

This is a good example of a graphic that may be disappointing if you don’t have the right understanding and expectation. With screen printing, you will have yellow and red plastisol ink directly applied to the fabric, but when you are only making one shirt it’s just not feasible to do it that way. Other than direct to garment printing, this would be the only way to make one black garment with this graphic.

 

*For either method, please wash inside out in cold water and dry on low heat for best results!*